Anxious Child: Toys for Anxious Children, Self-Regulation and Emotional Grounding

Posted by on 3/29/2017 to News
Anxious Child: Toys for Anxious Children, Self-Regulation and Emotional Grounding
All children become anxious and stressed out at one point of their education with tests, homework, big projects and understanding new concepts. However, anxiety is becoming a bigger issue for many of the children we see on a regular basis and it is much more extreme than normal stressful situations. Many of these children haven’t fully developed their limbic system that can lead to emotional grounding issues.

These types of emotions are often manifested in the classroom, at home and in social situations. Many children act out or are known as a “behavior problem” because they are emotionally immature for their age and don’t know how to self-regulate to calm their bodies and their emotions.

If we don’t develop these important areas of the brain, higher learning processes are often disrupted. For example, a child’s executive function is developed at the top level of the brain (cortical level) and is often responsible for a child’s reasoning, organization and planning. If the limbic part of the brain remains underdeveloped, there become gaps in the child’s executive function, which is normally displayed in the child’s emotional state.

If your child hasn’t fully developed their limbic system or if they don’t know how to self-regulate their emotions in the classroom, there are a few techniques you can try at home and at school. To calm an anxious child, you can do some breathing exercises, incorporate some calming activities in their routine or you can use different toys and fidget items to help regulate their emotions in the classroom.
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